Is it Jinetes or Ginetes?



With a very busy weekend behind me, I finally have time to post some completed projects.  These two units of Casting Room Miniatures Spanish Ginetes have been kicking around on the painting table for quite some time.  I think they represent some of the better sculpts from the line, I enjoy the look of them.  I went with a simple yellow and red scheme to underline the inherent Spanishness of the units for my Renaissance games.

The figures come with three separate embossed shields.   I swapped out some of them in order to get a more interesting mix for the Italian Swordsmen I did earlier as they were shipped with flat rounds only.  (You can see an example on the figure with the stripped pattern above.  The silver and bronze shield at the top is from The Assault Group)


Comments

  1. Your jinettes do look like good sculpts and will fit nicely into you . I still maintain that the CRM Normans are better out of the stable. Wait! You are using these for your Renaissance project? Could they not also be used in the Reconquista project too? It would be very handy if these light cav could see service for both.

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    1. They are Yellow and Red guys with the right shields. I think I can safely use them for either scenario though.

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  2. Stunning job on these Jinetes , congrats!

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  3. I like these and agree they are some of the better sculpts from that line. To me it looks like they used the dolls from the Foundry Conquistadors that Mark Copplestone did previously and built on from there.

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    1. Good eye. I had not noticed that. Regards!

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  4. Very, very nice. Yes, you certainly could use the Genitors (Ginetes/Jinetes) for the FReconquista - that's where the troops type originated from - fighting the Moors, co counter their numerous LC. Oyher than the Albanian Stradiots, thery were the only freal melee oriented LC (or perhaps better called MC?) of the Italian Wars, and they created quite a stir when they arrived in Italy with Gonsalvo de Cordoba... who himself had gained his reputation during the later years of the Reconquista. If you do more, I believe red and white was the more common shield pattern, especially for the heart shaped "adarga" (? sp) shields.

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